Tierna Unruh-Enos is publisher at The Paper.

According to The New York Times, QAnon supporters have been intercepting migrant children at the border with Mexico and then compiling information on their relatives in the U.S.

It’s a bizarre campaign being led by a man named Jason Frank, a minor influencer in QAnon circles, has been at the border since April in a borrowed RV. The movement, which has seen QAnon adherents and far-right activists enticing children who’ve just crossed the border with things like hot dogs and hamburgers. Frank and other members of his group have been camping out in Arizona “protect the children from sex trafficking” from a satanic cabal—a theme at the heart of the QAnon movement. “They are being trafficked, sex trafficked. That’s the No. 1 trade,” Frank was quoted as saying by the Times.

According to report, the group was seen intercepting a group of 15 migrant children from Guatemala, who were taken to a campsite where they were provided food. There, Frank gave them “Let’s Go Brandon” shirts with images of President Biden, after which the children were rounded up and made to pose for a group photo.

The podcast Red Pill 78 interviewed Frank on the border as he explained his process of ‘rescuing’ the children. “First off, we grab them, we pray for them, we love on them. In that process of having them here, we have them call their sponsors. And we start that intel, that research. Once we get that information, sometimes we trick them. We tell them we’re sending a care package. We get the address and we tear it up, man.” Frank told the podcast he has two missions, to intercept drugs and saving the children. He said he was working with the militia group, Veterans on Patrol.

When asked how many children were actually going to family members across the border, he said he felt that only 10 percent of children weren’t being trafficked, but had no actual facts or data to back that up.

Frank is also said to keep an AR-15 and a slew of other weapons inside his RV. While Frank has insisted his group always alerts Border Patrol to the children’s arrival, immigration activists have sounded the alarm over the QAnon supporters collecting information on the kids’ relatives in the U.S., something they say can lead to harassment of immigrant families. “We believe the conduct of this group is illegal and extremely dangerous,” public defender Margo Cowan told the Times.

Chris Nanos, the Pima County’s sheriff, called the “QAnon types” patrolling the border “nut jobs,” but said it was a matter for the US Customs and Border Protection agency to handle.